With kids heading back to the actual classroom this year expect to dig a little deeper into your wallet for school supplies.

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News 4 Buffalo reports that the National Retail Federation is predicting the average household will spend about $849 this year for school supplies compared to $685 in 2018 due to more electronic purchases and readjusting to in-person learning.

Economists say spending may be boosted by higher-than-normal savings from the pandemic, as well as the new federal child tax credit that began hitting families' checkbooks earlier this month.

Parents are basically playing catch-up after kids have been sitting at home learning in from a computer screen. Frederick Floss Buffalo State College economics and finance professor says...

“We’re probably going to by more apparel, more sneakers and those kinds of things, because for the last couple of years, we haven’t bought any,” Floss said. “If our kids are in middle school, all of the sudden their stuff is two sizes two small and you’re not going to let them go to school in that. It didn’t really matter when all they were wearing was sweatpants or shorts.”

Some Buffalo-area back-to-school shoppers have been seeing school supply prices trending upward.

“It has gone up a little bit on some things, but you just have to make due,” said Carla Reynolds Niagara Falls. “And, remember the children need what they need and that’s expected.”

Even teachers are seeing the change...

“I noticed everything getting a little more expensive and I know lists for parents are getting a little bit longer,” said Audrey Stafford teacher. “So, I know we worked hard this year to get some things off the list to keep it low for parents.”

 

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