If you love checking out some of the sleekest, fastest, hottest and classic cars, then this free car show is for you. The Full Throttle car show is happening on Saturday, October 2, 2021. It's taking place at The Powerhouse, which is located at 140 Lee Street in Buffalo. The show will feature more than 200 cars, trucks and motorcycles. It's a free event, which lasts from 9 am to 6 pm. Former NFL wide receiver Steve Johnson will make an appearance. There will also be vendors, food, music and more.

If you own a vehicle that you want to enter into the car show, you can register on the Full Throttle website. There is a $20 registration fee for cars featured outside and a $40 fee for cars showcased indoors. It's $20 to register motorcycles.

The same group that is producing this car show has several coming up in 2022.
 

Here's Why New Cars Are in Short Supply

While we're on the topic of cars, if you've been trying to buy a new car, you may have run into some difficulties due to a short supply. While consumer demand is up, a lack of microchips has caused manufacturers to have a difficult time keeping up with it.

You might want to consider putting a few more miles on your existing ride and waiting until the market cools off if you’re in the market from one of the brands Cox says account for the thinnest inventories with the fewest number of days to sell. These include Kia, Honda, Toyota, MINI, Subaru, Lexus, Mazda, GMC, Hyundai, and Land Rover. ~ Forbes

8 of the Most Expensive Cars

LOOK: See the iconic cars that debuted the year you were born

LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.