Tropical Depression Claudette is expected to grow stronger again and head up the East Coast after killing 13. Severe weather is forecast for Western New York.

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Over the weekend, Tropical Storm Claudette claimed at least 13 lives in Alabama. The North Carolina area is bracing for possible tornadoes on Monday. After touching down in North Caroline the storm is expected to continue to head up the East Coast.

Claudette was downgraded to a Tropical Depression but is expected to regain strength and make its way toward the East Coast, NPR reports.

Claudette should slowly strengthen over the Carolinas as it approaches the Mid-Atlantic Coast from the west, according to the National Weather Service. Tropical Storm conditions are expected to develop along the coastal regions of the Carolinas before the storm heads to the Atlantic Ocean.

Claudette is forecast to move eastward off the North Carolina coast on Monday and then move northeastward out over the Western Atlantic off the Northeast Coast past New York and travel towards the Canadian Maritimes by Wednesday, the National Weather Service reports.

The National Hurricane Centers track of the storm puts Claudette over the Atlantic Ocean near New York late Monday into Tuesday.

Severe storms are possible across the Northeast, including the Hudson Valley, on Monday, the National Weather Service warns. The National Weather Service issued a Hazardous Weather Outlook for the Hudson Valley for late Monday afternoon into the evening as there's a chance of severe thunderstorms.

"There is a low probability for widespread hazardous weather late today and early this evening. Stronger thunderstorms may be capable of producing isolated instances of damaging wind gusts," the National Weather Service states.

The National Weather Service also believes there's a strong chance of showers and thunderstorms Monday night and throughout Tuesday for the region.

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