This pandemic has taken a toll on everybody, to say the least, especially our young people. I know that every child and every household is different, there are some children that deal with tough situations better than others. I think it's fair to say any student that fell behind this school year really had a legitimate reason. Now that COVID-19 restrictions are lifted here in Western New York, Buffalo public schools are looking to get back to full in-person learning in the fall.

According to WGRZ, superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash recently talked about several other issues even more important than attendance. During the pandemic, students were struggling with hunger, homelessness, and the loss of family members. Yes, attendance was an important factor in students' education during the pandemic, but when a child is dealing with those factors mentioned, it obviously makes learning much harder.

Dr. Kriner Cash believes that more screen time is the answer to education loss from the pandemic, with the number of sophisticated applications for learning available to students it really should not be that difficult to catch up over the summer.

There on their phones 12 and 13 hours a day, now all they have to do is, get online and go to work.

said, Dr. Kriner Cash.

Get our free mobile app

I actually agree with the statement students just need to get online and get the work done, but I also feel that it is easier said than done if you're not disciplined enough to follow online instruction without the help of a teacher physically present.

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

READ MORE: See how some companies are changing their businesses to combat COVID-19