A number of local businesses have come up with some creative ways to support WNY communities of color, according to a WGRZ News report, by reaching out to help businesses of color within those communities which have been affected by the recent disturbances in response to George Floyd's death by a Police Officer who has been charged with Murder in the 2nd Degree.

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One local business owner, Jessica Fox, owner of Oak & Iron Salon & Tattoo in Buffalo, is offering 'free tattoos to social workers and therapists', according to WGRZ.   Social Workers and Therapists will, in return, provide free counseling services to people in communities of color.  Jessica was quoted by WGRZ as saying this:

"I can't personally speak to the experiences of what people are going through but being able to use my platform and what I can do to express some compassion and empathy,  We're not open yet. I'm just setting up anything for the future. I've even offered to do a gift certificate type situation,"

The WGRZ News article also identifies other businesses participating in the support of  communities of color as follows:

  • BreadHive Bakery & Cafe is selling its recipe for its famous West Side Sourdough, for $20, with the proceeds going to support local businesses and organizations of color in Buffalo.  They have raised $10,000 so far according to the WGRZ story.

  • What's Pop-in' Gourmet Popcorn' owner Stefan Coker is quoted by WGRZ as saying he's been getting local support in WNY as his company has been making deliveries to different States outside of New York and has been doing so before the nationwide protests ever started, according to the WGRZ News story. 

"I think it's amazing that people are starting to have this kind of acknowledgment. this kind of stuff has been going on for a long time," Coker said. "And I ask myself, will we still get this kind of praise six months from now? where will this take us?"

The owner has set up a GoFuundMe page to help raise monies for a Delivery Van so they can more easily deliver to communities of color who need items delivered, according to WGRZ